what is math? interpolation of imaging

The research highlight of the day was a long call with Dustin Lang (Toronto) to discuss about interpolation, centroiding, and (crazily) lexicographic ordering. The latter is part of a project I want to do to understand how to search in a controlled way for useful statistics or informative anomalies in cosmological data. He found it amusing that my request of mathematicians for a lexicographic ordering of statistical operations was met with the reaction “that's not math, that's philosophy”.

On centroiding and interpolation: It looks like Lang is finding (perhaps not surprisingly) that standard interpolators (the much-used approximations to sinc-interpolation) in astronomy very slightly distort the point-spread function in imaging, and that distortion is a function of sub-pixel shift. He is working on making better interpolators, but both he and I are concerned about reinventing wheels. Some of the things he is worried about will affect spectroscopy as well as imaging, and, since EPRV projects are trying to do things at the 1/1000 pixel level, it might really, really matter.

1 comment:

  1. If you don't know your pixel response over the surface of the pixel, I suspect your interpolators won't work... and if the pixel responses vary as a function of wavelength, this may be a very, very hairy problem indeed.